Free and open source concept map app for Moodle

Concept MapI’m pleased to announce that the  Concept Map app is now available on my Github.com repository as a free and open source project. It works with the SWF Activity Module for Moodle 1.9 and 2.5+ and a compiled version of the app is included pre-installed with the latest version of the SWF Activity Module for Moodle 2.5+.

What does the Concept Map app do?

Learners are presented with a blank page and drawing and writing tools with a limited palate of colours and shapes. Limiting the colour and shape options is intended to reduce the time and effort that learners spend on those aspects and hopefully focus their attention more on their learning objectives. Learners can draw and write and move the drawn lines, shapes, and text. The app works with all the usual input tools such as mouse, keyboard, and touch screen.

When learners are ready, they can click on the camera icon button to send a copy of the image to the server which gets saved as a PNG image file. Subsequent camera icon button clicks will overwrite the existing image for that particular activity for that particular learner. However, if you’d like to keep a history of images, the service script that saves the images can be modified to do that. If it’s deployed in Moodle, a corresponding grade book entry is created for the learner and the image is embedded in the grade book feedback column. The saved concept map can then be viewed and graded by teachers. In addition, learners with the appropriate permissions can view their concept maps in the grade book or in the File System repository and embed them in other Moodle activities.

Free and open source

As a free and open source project, it’s free to download, use, edit, and redistribute under the terms of the GPLv3 licence. This means that you can develop the project further to perform more or different functions according to your learners’ particular needs and learning ideas. The project is configured to work with FlashDevelop, a free and open source Actionscript and Flash integrated development environment (IDE) but can also be edited and compiled with other Flash and Actionscript IDEs.

Useful links

Greenwood College SchoolAcknowledgement

The interactive whiteboard SWF idea was conceived at Greenwood College School as a means to further personalize the learning experience for its students. Greenwood is excited to be partnering with Matt Bury on this project because this module enhancement will help educators using Moodle to track student progress using a flexible, online input method.

Greenwood College School

Moodle.org introduce their first MOOC

LearnMoodleThis is just a quick annoucement about a project that may be of interest to teachers who are new to Moodle.

Moodle for teachers: An introduction is a 4 week introductory course with a recommended total of 8-12 hours participation time. Registration opens on 19th August 2013 and the course starts on 1st September 2013. There are no fees for taking the course and successful participants will be awarded a Mozilla Open Badges course completion badge that they can add to their Open Badges backpack.

From the course outline, it looks like it will be of most interest to teachers who have never used Moodle before, are curious about it, and only want to make a minimal commitment. Experienced Moodle teachers are also invited to participate as helpers and may be awarded a “helper badge.” I also suspect this is a experimental pilot project and that the intention is to provide a proof of concept for using Moodle for MOOCs and perhaps to investigate the possiblity of offering accredited Moodle training and professional development programmes in the MOOC course format. Moodle partners have already been offering Moodle Course Creator Certification courses (for between $200 and $800 AUD) since at least 2007 (Originally called the Moodle Teacher Certificate).

For more details and enrolment see: http://learn.moodle.net/

BTW, Moodle was informally used by some learners in the original MOOC courses, ChangeMOOC: Connectivism and Connective Knowledge, started in 2008 at the University of Manitoba and run by Stephen Downes (National Research Council of Canada) and George Siemens (Athabasca University), in which I participated.

Update on the free online interactive c-test generator

Flash logoIn January of this year (2013) I published an article on my C-Test Generator which I made freely available for everyone to use so that they can generate their own c-tests quickly and easily. Since then, it has occured to me that it would also be useful to be able to generate text versions of c-tests that can be printed and photocopied for those who don’t have computers readily available or if teachers would like to create specific language proficiency tests for their learners.

What is it and what does it do?

Please see the previous article, Free online interactive c-test generator, for more information about what c-tests are, how they are an improvement on cloze tests, and what the C-Test Generator app does.

What has changed?

The c-test generator app, in addition to creating an interactive online c-test, now generates an additional pure text version. By clicking on the “Copy” button, the text is automatically saved to your operating system’s clip board. You can then paste it into a text document such as OpenOffice/LibreOffice Writer or MS Word. If you adjust the kerning (space between letters), you’ll be able to see one underscore for each deleted letter, which looks more like betw_ _ _ than betw___. In OpenOffice/LibreOffice:

  1. Highlight the text that you want to adjust the kerning on
  2. Go to Format > Character… > Position
  3. Under “Spacing”, select “Expanded” from the dropdown list
  4. In the “by” section increase the pts to widen the character spacing (You should see a preview). About 2.0 pts should be enough.

The process wil be similar in MS Word. Check their help and documentation for details. Please note the the same C-Test Generator app is embedded in this page and the previos C-Test Generator article page.

[swfobj src=”https://matbury.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/blog_c_test.swf” width=”600″ height=”600″ allowfullscreen=”true”]

Click here for direct link to C-Test Generator app for full browser window.

There’s also a licensable version of the C-Test Generator app that integrates with Moodle and saves learners’ grades and c-test texts in Moodle’s grade book.

I’m moving my open source projects from Google to GitHub

github logoThis is a quick announcement concerning my open source project hosting. On the 20th May 2013, Google Code posted the following announcement;

Starting today, existing projects that do not have any downloads and all new projects will not have the ability to create downloads. Existing projects with downloads will see no visible changes until January 14, 2014 and will no longer have the ability to create new downloads starting on January 15, 2014.  All existing downloads in these projects will continue to be accessible for the foreseeable future.” — Source: http://google-opensource.blogspot.ca/2013/05/a-change-to-google-code-download-service.html

In other words, as of 15th January 2014, I will not longer be able to provide installer packages for my open source projects on Google Code. Because of this and the greater flexibility, functionality, IDE integration, and social features of Github, I am moving my projects there. My Github repositories are available here: https://github.com/matbury

“Unshuffled” option now available on MILAs

Listen and select MILA (unshuffled)I’ve added a new option to some of my Multimedia Interactive Learning Applications (MILAs). Teachers, curriculum developers and course content developers can now set MILAs to generate learning activities in sequential order, in other words, unshuffled.

Why generate unshuffled learning activities?

By default, MILAs shuffle the order that items appear in to make them less predictable and ensure that learners don’t rely on non-linguistic cues to find the correct responses, i.e. the answers and distractors are rarely in the same positions or order twice and so learners’ only option is to look and/or listen for linguistic cues. In the same way, it’s usually a good idea to shuffle a deck of cards regularly in a card game to make the order of the cards less predictable and the game more interesting.

However, in some instances it can be beneficial to learners if we present learning activities in sequential order. This allows a several possibilities I have thought of and probably many more that I haven’t. For example, if English as a Second, Foreign or International Language learners are acquiring language for daily routines, it would be more helpful to learners if they are presented in sequence at first, thereby preserving the narrative nature of the language and enabling learners to make sense of it (understand it) more easily, therefore making language acquisition more probable.

Another example would be using story telling/narratives to help convey meaning by presenting background and contextual story lines to teach salient points about more abstract concepts, ideas and theories. A narrative could convey background information and context, the HOWs and the WHYs and the process of discovery that the scientist or thinker went through before they arrived at their “eureka” moment; Otherwise known as a case study.

Yet another possible use would be to present incorrect or incomplete narratives based around some idea, topic or event as an introductory stimulus for a broader narrative inquiry based project. Learners would then have to discover what is wrong or missing and construct their own correct or complete narratives. Freer, more expansive narrative inquiry tasks could then follow.

…or it may be something as simple as matching pictures to the lines of a song.

I think (speculatively) such techniques can help learning to be more interesting, engaging and enjoyable for learners.

Which MILAs does this apply to?

The following MILAs now have the unshuffled option:

How do I use the unshuffled option?

The default setting is shuffled so updating your copy of these MILAs will have no effect on existing learning interactions. Simply by passing in the “shuffle = false” parameter sets any learning interaction to generate the activities in the order in which they appear in the Learning Content Cartridge SMIL XML file. In Moodle, it works like this:

  1. Edit or create a new instance of the SWF Activity Module
  2. Select the MILA and Learning Content Cartridge in the usual way and set any other parameters as necessary
  3. In the FlashVars Learning Interaction Data section put: Name: shuffle Value: false
  4. Save and preview
  5. That’s it!

Demo

Live demos of all the MILAs shown on this site are available to try out. Click on the matbury.com logo to go to the MILAs demo course on Matt’s R&D Moodle. Look for the SWF Activity Module instances called Numbers 0 to 120, unshuffled:

matbury.com Moodle logo

Related links

And finally

I’d be very interested to hear of any other possible uses of unshuffled MILA learning interactions. What could you use them for?