Presentations on Learning

Ken Robinson says schools kill creativity (video)

Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity.

Sir Ken Robinson: Bring on the learning revolution! (video)

In this poignant, funny follow-up to his fabled 2006 talk, Sir Ken Robinson makes the case for a radical shift from standardized schools to personalized learning — creating conditions where kids’ natural talents can flourish.

RSA Animate – Changing Education Paradigms (Ken Robinson) (video)

This animate was adapted from a talk given at the RSA by Sir Ken Robinson, world-renowned education and creativity expert and recipient of the RSA’s Benjamin Franklin award. For more information on Sir Ken’s work visit: http://www.sirkenrobinson.com

Diana Laufenberg: How to learn? From mistakes (video)

Diana Laufenberg shares 3 surprising things she has learned about teaching — including a key insight about learning from mistakes.

Kathryn Schulz: On being wrong (video)

Most of us will do anything to avoid being wrong. But what if we’re wrong about that? “Wrongologist” Kathryn Schulz makes a compelling case for not just admitting but embracing our fallibility.

Dan Meyer: Math class needs a makeover (video)

Today’s math curriculum is teaching students to expect — and excel at — paint-by-numbers classwork, robbing kids of a skill more important than solving problems: formulating them. At TEDxNYED, Dan Meyer shows classroom-tested math exercises that prompt students to stop and think.

John Hunter on the World Peace Game (video)

John Hunter puts all the problems of the world on a 4′x5′ plywood board — and lets his 4th-graders solve them. At TED2011, he explains how his World Peace Game engages schoolkids, and why the complex lessons it teaches — spontaneous, and always surprising — go further than classroom lectures can.

Sugata Mitra: The child-driven education (video)

Education scientist Sugata Mitra tackles one of the greatest problems of education — the best teachers and schools don’t exist where they’re needed most. In a series of real-life experiments from New Delhi to South Africa to Italy, he gave kids self-supervised access to the web and saw results that could revolutionize how we think about teaching.

Liz Coleman’s call to reinvent liberal arts education (video)

Bennington president Liz Coleman delivers a call-to-arms for radical reform in higher education. Bucking the trend to push students toward increasingly narrow areas of study, she proposes a truly cross-disciplinary education — one that dynamically combines all areas of study to address the great problems of our day.

Richard Baraniuk on open-source learning (video)

Rice University professor Richard Baraniuk explains the vision behind Connexions, his open-source, online education system. It cuts out the textbook, allowing teachers to share and modify course materials freely, anywhere in the world.

Blended Learning Revisited (video)

Even when children are high achievers and facile with new technology, many seem gradually to lose their sense of wonder and curiosity, notes John Seely Brown. Traditional educational methods may be smothering their innate drive to explore the world. Brown and like-minded colleagues are developing the underpinnings for a new 21st century pedagogy that broadens rather than narrows horizons.

John Seely Brown, former chief scientist at Xerox, has morphed in recent years into the “Chief of Confusion,” seeking “the right questions” in a range of fields, including education. He finds unusual sources for his questions: basketball and opera coaches, surfing and video game champions. He’s gathered insights from unorthodox venues, and from more traditional classrooms, to paint quite a different picture of what learning might look like.

The typical college lecture class frequently gathers many students together in a large room to be ‘fed’ knowledge, believes Brown. But studies show that “learning itself is socially constructed,” and is most effective when students interact with and teach each other in manageable groups. Brown wants to open up “niche learning experiences” that draw on classic course material, but deepen it to be maximally enriching.

In basketball and opera master classes, and in architecture labs, he has seen how individuals become acculturated in a “community of practice,” learning to “be” rather than simply to “do.” Whether performing, creating, or experimenting, students are critiqued, respond, offer their own criticism, and glean rich wisdom from a cyclical group experience. Brown says something “mysterious” may be taking place: “In deeply collective engagement in processes…you start to marinate in a problem space.” Through communities of practice, students’ minds “begin to gel up,” even in the face of abstraction and unfamiliarity, and “all of a sudden, (the subject) starts to make sense.”

Brown cites the entire MIT campus as a “participatory learning platform,” where “people create stuff to be read and tried and critiqued,” where cognitive “apprenticeships” lead to networks of practice. “Deep tinkering” is encouraged, which accelerates the building of instinct that is essential in creating a “tacit dimension” of familiarity with complex subject matter. This is “playing at its deepest sense,” says Brown, and the way to create resilient students who “learn to become,” and “don’t fear change” in a world full of flux.

John Seely Brown’s personal website

Notes

The links on this page are personally gathered, viewed and assessed by Matt Bury. They are included purely on the basis of relevance to the areas of elearning, and second language acquisition theory and practice. This is a non sponsored and impartial blog that reflects Matt Bury’s interests and activities. It does not include links to web pages, web sites or services from commercial organisations. Any requests to include them will be ingnored.

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